• Brown Kiwi & Spotted Kiwi

    Print Size: 210mm x 297mm

    Material: Card

    Kiwi are flightless birds endemic to New Zealand, their are the only bird to have nostrils at the end of their very long bill and by far the smallest living ratites.

    There are two species of Kiwi’s in New Zealand, the Brown Kiwi and the Spotted Kiwi. Within these two species are six varieties of Kiwi: Little Spotted Kiwi, North Island Brown Kiwi, Great Spotted Kiwi, Okarita Brown, Stewart island Brown, Haast Brown

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  • Harakeke

    Print Size: 210mm x 297mm

    Material: Card

    New Zealand Flax, known by the Māori names Harakeke. Flax bushes will often support a large community of animals, providing shelter and an abundant food resource.

    Although the Māori made textiles from a number of other plants, the use of harakeke and wharariki was predominant.

    For centuries, Māori have used Harakeke for medicinal purposes, as a mild anaesthetic, poultice for boils, tumours, as well as to varicose ulcers. It also use as disinfectant and abscesses, relieve constipation, expel worms. The gum-like sap produced by Harakeke contains enzymes that give it blood clotting and antiseptic qualities to help healing processes.

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  • Hihi

    Print Size: 210mm x 297mm

    Material: Card

    The Stitchbird or Māori it name Hihi. It is one of New Zealand’s rarest birds.

    Hihi build their nests in tree cavities. The nest is complex with a stick base topped with a nest cup of finer twigs and lined with fern scales, lichen and spider web.

    Hihi have a diverse mating system, they are the only birds known to sometimes mate face to face, and a female may breed with a single male or with several.

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  • Huia

    Print Size: 210mm x 297mm

    Material: Card

    The Huia was the largest species of New Zealand wattlebird, endemic to the North Island of New Zealand. Its extinction in the early 20th century. The two major cause of extinction was overhunting to procure Huia skins for mounted specimens and the widespread deforestation of the lowlands of the North Island by European settlers. Huia were primarily found in broadleaf-podocarp forests where there was a dense understorey, with the lost of ancient, ecologically complex primary forests, they were unable to survive in regenerating secondary forests.

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  • Kaka

    Print Size: 210mm x 297mm

    Material: Card

    The New Zealand Kaka, also known as Kākā, (Nestor meridionalis) is a New Zealand parrot endemic to the native forests of New Zealand.

    The New Zealand Kaka lives in lowland and mid-altitude native forest. Its strongholds are currently the offshore reserves of Kapiti Island, Codfish Island and Little Barrier Island. It is breeding rapidly in the mainland island sanctuary at Zealandia (Karori Wildlife Sanctuary), with over 300 birds banded since their reintroduction in 2002.

     

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  • Kākāpō

    Print Size: 210mm x 297mm

    Material: Card

    The Kākāpō, also called owl parrot, is a species of large, flightless nocturnal parrot endemic to New Zealand. Although it cannot fly, it is good at climbing trees. Kākāpō are the heaviest parrot in the world, and the only parrot to have a ‘lek’ mating system.

    At the beginning of the 19th century, kākāpō were still widespread throughout New Zealand. From the 1840s, European settlers not only hunted the bird, but also set fire to bush for farming, destroying its habitat. By the 1970s, only a few isolated birds were known to exist in Fiordland, South Island. A survey of Stewart Island in 1977 found about 200 more birds but they were rapidly declining through predation by feral cats.

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  • Kākāpō (2017)

    Print Size: 210mm x 297mm

    Material: Card

    The Kākāpō, also called owl parrot, is a species of large, flightless nocturnal parrot endemic to New Zealand. Although it cannot fly, it is good at climbing trees. Kākāpō are the heaviest parrot in the world, and the only parrot to have a ‘lek’ mating system.

    At the beginning of the 19th century, kākāpō were still widespread throughout New Zealand. From the 1840s, European settlers not only hunted the bird, but also set fire to bush for farming, destroying its habitat. By the 1970s, only a few isolated birds were known to exist in Fiordland, South Island. A survey of Stewart Island in 1977 found about 200 more birds but they were rapidly declining through predation by feral cats.

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  • Kākāriki (Red-crowned Parakeet)

    Print Size: 210mm x 297mm

    Material: Card

    The New Zealand parakeet. Its known by its Māori name of kākāriki, meaning ‘small green parrot’. There are five main species of kākāriki: Yellow-crowned parakeet, Orange-fronted parakeet, Red-crowned parakeet
    Forbes’ parakeet and Antipodes Island parakeet.

    Mitochondrial DNA analysis has indicated that the orange-fronted parakeet is a separate species and not just a colour variation of the yellow-crowned parakeet. The orange-fronted parakeet is highly endangered, with less than 200 individuals remaining in the North Canterbury region of the South Island.

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  • Kārearea

    Print Size: 210mm x 297mm

    Material: Card

    New Zealand falcon or Kārearea is endemic to this New Zealand and is one of our most spectacular birds. It capable of flying at speeds over 100 km/h, and can catch prey larger than itself.

    Although still widespread where suitable habitat exists, numbers have declined and predation by cats, mustelids, and hedgehogs is emerging as a problem for ground nesting falcons.

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  • Kea

    Print Size: 210mm x 297mm

    Material: Card

    The Kea is the world’s only alpine parrot, a large species of parrot found in forested and alpine regions of the South Island of New Zealand. Kea are known for their intelligence and curiosity. It called “the clown of the mountains”, it will investigate backpacks, boots or even cars, often causing damage or flying off with smaller items. Kea can solve logical puzzles, such as pushing and pulling things in a certain order to get to food, and will work together to achieve a certain objective. this is vital to their survival in a harsh mountain environment.

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  • Kereru

    Print Size: 210mm x 297mm

    Material: Card

    The New Zealand Pigeon or kererū is a bird endemic to New Zealand. Kererū are commonly called wood pigeons but are not the same as the Wood Pigeon (Columba palumbus), which is a member of a different genus. Since the extinction of the moa, the kererū and parea are now the only seed dispersers with a bill big enough to swallow large fruit, such as those of karaka, miro, tawa and taraire. The disappearance of these birds could be a disaster for the regeneration of New Zealand native forests.

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  • Kiwi

    Print Size: 210mm x 297mm

    Material: Card

    Kiwi are flightless birds endemic to New Zealand, their are the only bird to have nostrils at the end of their very long bill and by far the smallest living ratites.

    There are two species of Kiwi’s in New Zealand, the Brown Kiwi and the Spotted Kiwi. Within these two species are six varieties of Kiwi: Little Spotted Kiwi, North Island Brown Kiwi, Great Spotted Kiwi, Okarita Brown, Stewart island Brown, Haast Brown

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  • Kōkako

    Print Size: 210mm x 297mm

    Material: Card

    Kōkako are endangered forest birds which are endemic to New Zealand. There are two sub-species of Kōkako, the North Island Kōkako and the South Island Kōkako. Kōkako declines were undoubtedly caused by forest clearance, and the introduction of predators.

    In Māori myth, it was the Kōkako that gave Maui water as he fought the sun. The kōkako filled its wattles with water and brought it to Maui. His thirst quenched, Maui rewarded the kōkako by making its legs long and slender, enabling the bird to bound through the forest with ease in search of food.

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  • Kōpukapuka

    Print Size: 210mm x 297mm

    Material: Card

    The Mount Cook Lily or Kōpukapuka is in fact not a lily at all. It belongs to the buttercup family. The Mount Cook Lily is one of New Zealand’s most well known alpine plants.

    It grows in sub-alpine to alpine herbfields in the South Island mountains from 700m to 1500m in altitude. It is well adapted to grow in infertile soils and it favours stream banks and damp locations in scrub and grasslands.

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  • Korimako

    Print Size: 210mm x 297mm

    Material: Card

    Bellbirds also known by its Māori names Korimako and Makomako. Korimako are unique to New Zealand. The explorer Captain Cook described of its song “it seemed to be like small bells most exquisitely tuned”.

    Their numbers declined sharply in 19 century, For a time it was thought they might vanish from the mainland. Their numbers recovered somewhat from about 1940 onwards.

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  • Kōtare

    Print Size: 210mm x 297mm

    Material: Card

    The sacred kingfisher, also known by its Māori name Kōtare in New Zealand. They live in a wide range of habitats, including forest, river margins, farmland, lakes, estuaries and rocky coastlines in Australia, New Zealand, and other parts of the western Pacific.

    It is called “sacred” for it was said to be a holy bird for Polynesians, who believed it to have control over the waves, and other kingfishers in the southwestern Pacific were ascribed venerable power over the ocean.

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  • Kōtuku

    Print Size: 210mm x 297mm

    Material: Card

    The Eastern Great Egret is a white heron, it is common in Australia, the South Pacific and Asia. In New Zealand, where it is known as the kōtuku, and highly endangered, with only one breeding site at Okarito Lagoon. The species is protected in Australia under the National Parks and Wildlife Act 1974.

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  • Kūaka

    Print Size: 210mm x 297mm

    Material: Card

    The Bar-tailed Godwit or ‘Kūaka’ in Māori. Kūaka breeds on Arctic coasts and tundra mainly in the Old World, They spend the Austral summer in New Zealand and Australia. Every September about 80,000 of them will fly back to New Zealand. Its migration is the longest known non-stop flight of any bird and also the longest journey without pausing to feed by any animal.

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  • Mātātā

    Print Size: 210mm x 297mm

    Material: Card

    The New Zealand Fernbird or the Māori names are Kōtātā or Mātātā. Is an insectivorous at risk endemic species which inhabits wetlands throughout New Zealand.

    Early settlers called it the “swamp sparrow” because of its colouration. They are heard more often than seen. Calls are often the only evidence that they are present in a wetland.

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  • Nīkau

    Print Size: 210mm x 297mm

    Material: Card

    The Nīkau is a palm tree endemic to New Zealand, and the only palm native to New Zealand. It primarily occurs in coastal to lowland forest in warmer regions.

    Nīkau palms have had importance in Mäori life. The leaves were used to thatch houses, to wrap food before cooking, and to weave into hats, mats, baskets, and leggings for travelling through rough undergrowth.

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  • Parekareka

    Print Size: 210mm x 297mm

    Material: Card

    The spotted shag or parekareka is a species of cormorant endemic to New Zealand. before the breeding season it bill turns green-blue and bare facial skin between the eye.

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  • Piwakawaka

    Print Size: 210mm x 297mm

    Material: Card

    The fantail (Maori name: Piwakawaka) is one of New Zealand’s best known birds, as it is one of the few native bird species in New Zealand that has been able to adapt to an environment greatly altered by humans.

    In Maori mythology, the piwakawaka is a messenger, bringing news of death from the gods to the people.

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  • Pohowera

    The Banded Dotterel or Pohowera, is the most common small plover of New Zealand seashores, estuaries and riverbeds.

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  • Pōhutukawa (2017)

    Print Size: 210mm x 297mm

    Material: Card

    The Pōhutukawa tree, the iconic Kiwi Christmas tree, which often features on greeting cards and in poems and songs, has become an important symbol for New Zealanders at home and abroad.

    Renowned for its vibrant colour and its ability to survive even perched on rocky, precarious cliffs, it has found an important place in New Zealand culture for its strength and beauty.

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  • Ponga

    Silver Fern or Ponga is a species of medium-sized tree fern, endemic to New Zealand. Its fronds have a distinctive silver underside. Māori laid them silver-side up as track markers for night walking. The koru symbol is inspired by the shape of an unfurling silver fern frond.

    The earliest use of the silver fern as an official national symbol was by the New Zealand Army during the Second Boer War. Since then the fern has become one of the most widely recognised symbols of New Zealand.

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  • Pūkeko

    Print Size: 210mm x 297mm

    Material: Card

    The Purple Swamphen, in New Zealand, where it is known as the Pūkeko. Pūkeko is probably one of the most recognised native birds in New Zealand with its distinctive colourings and habit. It look very similar to takahe, although takahe are much heavier.

    The colour red was associated with nobility and power by Māori so the Pūkeko was held in high esteem because of its red beak and legs.

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  • Takahe

    Print Size: 210mm x 297mm

    Material: Card

    The Takahē was once thought to be extinct, but in the 1948 Geoffrey Orbell rediscovered the bird high in the tussock grasslands of the remote Murchison Mountains, Fiordland. Despite years of conservation effort, the Takahē remains critically endangered.

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  • Tākapu

    Print Size: 210mm x 297mm

    Material: Card

    The Australasian gannet or Tākapu is common in New Zealand coastal waters. Their breeding habitat is on islands and the coast of New Zealand. In New Zealand there are colonies of over 10,000 breeding pairs each at Three Kings Islands, Whakaari, Gannet Island, as well as numerous other island colonies. There is a large protected colony on the mainland at Cape Kidnappers, Muriwai and Farewell Spit.

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  • Tauhou

    Print Size: 210mm x 297mm

    Material: Card

    Silvereye (The Māori name Tauhou) was first recorded in New Zealand in 1832 and since there is no evidence that it was artificially introduced, it is classified as a native species. They are now wide distribution throughout New Zealand.

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  • Tī Kōuka

    Print Size: 210mm x 297mm

    Material: Card

    The Cabbage Tree or Tī Kōuka is one of the most distinctive trees in the New Zealand landscape. It has lovely scented flowers in early summer, which turn into bluish-white berries that birds love to eat.

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  • Tieke

    Print Size: 210mm x 297mm

    Material: Card

    The Saddlebacks or Tieke, its taxonomic family is also known as “wattlebirds”. All members of this family have coloured fleshy appendages on either side of the beak known as “wattles”. In the case of the saddlebacks, they are a vivid red in colour.

    Tieke were once widespread throughout New Zealand’s mainland and island forests. Their decline began in the mid 19th century, both North Island saddleback (Philesturnus rufusater) and South Island saddleback (P. carunculatus) were close to extinction. The most endangered of the two species is the South Island saddleback, with only 650 birds in existence.

    The North Island saddleback is now resident on nine large islands (7,000 ha) and is in a favourable position to survive. The South Island species is on 11 smaller islands (500 ha) and it needs translocating onto further predator-free islands if it is to recover.

     

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  • Tītipounamu

    Print Size: 210mm x 297mm

    Material: Card

    The Rifleman or Tītipounamu is one of only two surviving species within the ancient endemic New Zealand wren family. It is New Zealand’s smallest endemic bird, with fully grown adults reaching around 8 cm, weigh around 6g to 7g.

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  • Toutouwai

    Print Size: 210mm x 297mm

    Material: Card

    The New Zealand robin or toutouwai are friendly and trusting bird found only in New Zealand.
    There are three different species/sub-species of New Zealand robin: North Island robin, South Island robin and Stewart Island robin.

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  • Tuatara

    Print Size: 210mm x 297mm

    Material: Card

    The Tuatara is a reptile endemic to New Zealand. They are the only surviving members of the order Sphenodontia, which was well represented by many species during the age of the dinosaurs.

    The name “Tuatara” derives from the Māori language, and means “peaks on the back”.

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  • Tui

    Print Size: 210mm x 297mm

    Material: Card

    The Tui is an endemic passerine bird of New Zealand. It is one of the largest members of the diverse honeyeater family. Nectar is the normal diet but fruit and insects are frequently eaten, and pollen and seeds more occasionally.

    Tuis prefer broadleaf forests below 1500 metres. but will tolerate quite small remnant patches, regrowth, exotic plantations and well-vegetated suburbs.

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  • Wētā

    Print Size: 210mm x 297mm

    Material: Card

    Weta is the name given to about 70 insect species endemic to New Zealand.  The name comes from the Māori word ‘Wētā’ and is the same in the plural (like ‘sheep’). The Māori word for the giant weta is ‘Wētā Punga’. There are five broad groups of Weta: Tree Weta, Ground Weta, Cave Weta, Giant Weta, Tusked Weta, Tree Weta are those most commonly encountered in suburban settings in the North Island.

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